• Thunder Dog by Michael Hingson

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 9/11/2018

    In honor of September 11, today's recommended book is Thunder Dog by Michael Hingson.  Michael Hingson, blind from birth, was working on the 78th floor of the the North Tower of the World Trade Center on 9/11.  This powerful book tells the story of his survival, thanks to his beloved guide dog, Roselle.  This book highlights the incredible bond between one man and his guide dog on one of the most tragic days in American history.  

     

    Thunder Dog

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  • Autism Awareness Month

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 4/9/2018

    Today's book of the day in honor of National Autism Awareness Month is Following Ezra: What One Father Learned about Gumby, Otters, Autism, and Love from His Extraordinary Son by Tom Fields-Meyer.  Full of tender moments and unexpected humor, Following Ezra is the story of a father and a son on a ten-year journey from Ezra's diagnosis to the dawn of his adolescence.  It celebrates his evolution from a remote toddler to an extraordinary young man connected in his own remarkable ways to the world around him.  

    Following Ezra

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  • Autism Awareness Month

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 4/5/2018

    Today's book in honor of Autism Awareness Month is Look me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison.  Ever since he was small, John Robison had longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits--an inclination to blurt out non-sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig 5-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them)--had earned him the label "social deviant." No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings pickling himself with sherry.  It was no wonder he gravitated to machines, which coud, at least, be counted on.  After fleeing his parents and dropping out of high school, his savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars.  Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company.  But the higher Robison rose in the company, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate.  It wasn't worth the paycheck.  It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had a form of autism called Asperger's Syndrome.  That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself--and the world.  Look me in the Eye is the moving, darkly funny story of growing up with Asperger's at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist.  A born storyteller, Robison takes you inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as "defective," who could not avail himself of KISS's endless supply of groupies, and who still has a peculiar aversion to using people's given names (he calls his wife "Unit Two").  He also provides a fascinating reverse angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents--the boy who would later change his name to Augusten Burroughs and write the besteslling memoir Running with Scissors.  If you would like to read this book, stop by the library.

     

    look me in the eye

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  • Autism Awareness Month

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 4/3/2018

    April is National Autism Awareness Month.  In  honor of that, we will be highlighting some of the great books we have about autism.  Today's book is What Color is Monday: How Autism Changed One Family for the Better by Carrie Cariello.  Raising 5 children would be challenge enough for most parents, but when one of them has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, life becomes a bit more chaotic, a lot more emotional, and full of fascinating glimpses into a unique child's different way of thinking.  In this moving memoir, Carrie Cariello invites us to take a peek into exactly what it takes to get through each day juggling  the needs of her whole family.  Through hilarious mishaps, honest insights, and heartfelt letters addressed to her children, she shows us the beauty and wonder of raising a child who views the world through a different lens, and how ultimately autism changed her family for the better.  If you want to check out this book, stop by the library. 

    What Color is Monday?

     

     

     

     

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  • What Color is Monday?

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 4/3/2018

    April is National Autism Awareness Month.  In honor of that, stop by the library and check out one of our many great books about autism.  Today's book of the day is What Color is Monday: How Autism Changed One Family for the Better by Carrie Cariello.  Raising 5 children would be challenge enough for most parents, but when one of them has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, life becomes a bit more chaotic, a lot more emotional, and full of fascinating glimpses into a unique child's different way of thinking.  In this moving memoir, Carrie Cariello invites us to take a peek into exactly what it takes to get through each day juggling the needs of her whole family.  Through hilarious mishaps, honest insights, and heartfelt letters addressed to her children, she shows us the beauty and wonder of raising a child who views the world through a different lens, and how ultimately, autism changed one family for the better.  If you want to read this book, stop by the library to check it out.  

    What Color is Monday

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  • New year, new books

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 1/2/2018

    Looking for a New Year's resolution?  Consider making a resolution to read more in 2018.  Reading is a proven stress reducer, will entertain you, and is completely free (if you get your books from the library).  We have lots of new teen fiction books here at the library, so stop by and check one out today.  New to the shelf today is This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada.  If you like thrilling science fiction books, check this one out.  HAPPY READING & HAPPY NEW YEAR!

     

    This Mortal Coil

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  • Hiddensee: A Tale of the Once and Future Nutcracker

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 11/13/2017

    Attention Gregory Maguire fans, his newest book, Hiddensee: A Tale of the Once and Future Nutcracker, is now available at the library.  In this story, Maguire blends the legend of the famous Nutcracker with the life of Drosselmeier, the toy maker who carves him.  

     

    Hiddensee

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  • Turtles All The Way Down

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 10/10/2017

    John Green's newest book, Turtles All The Way Down, released today and the library has a copy.  If you are a John Green fan, stop by to check it out!

     

    Turtles All The Way Down

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  • Sleeping Beauties

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 10/5/2017

    If you are a Stephen King fan, stop by the library and check out his newest book, Sleeping Beauties.  It is co-authored with his son, Owen King, and considers the question: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?  If you are in the mood for a horror book, and want to check out this book, stop by the library.  

     

    sleeping beauties

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  • Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas

    Posted by Deborah Sharpe on 9/29/2017

    If you love the Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas, be sure to stop by the library to check out the latest book in the series, Tower of Dawn.  

     

    Tower of Dawn

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