• Current House Points

    Bowen Dohan Hyde McClellan
    1078 1108

    1086

    922

  • The House Program at The Woodstock Academy is rooted in the tradition of English boarding schools. House Programs are now common throughout the United States and in many international boarding programs.  Most teens today are familiar with the house system through popular culture and the Harry Potter book series.  Initially launched in 2019, WA’s House Program came to a halt due to the pandemic. Houses are being re-established this year now that our population and program has returned to a more normal status. Houses are designed to provide a smaller subunit of a community to create connection and to help establish camaraderie. Here at The Academy, the House Program was founded to provide residential students and staff with smaller, family-sized social groups, bringing together community members from different dorms and different grades. The House Program was also initiated to celebrate and honor the school’s history of leaders and learners who might serve as role models for students.

     

    Learn More

     

    House Bowen commemorates a family legacy of leadership, generosity, and investment. Henry Bowen was one of the original “goers’ who, in 1686, came and established New Roxbury, the town that was later named Woodstock. The Bowen family established themselves on the Hill and William Bowen was one of the founders of The Academy in 1801. George Bowen sent Henry, one of his four children, to The Woodstock Academy. Henry C. Bowen went on to be one of the most devoted alumni in the history of the school. Through his patronage, the Academy Building was built, a significant endowment was established, and an updated governing structure was established. Henry C. Bowen was known for his progressive views as an abolitionist against slavery, for hosting U.S. Presidents here in Woodstock, and for his vision for an independent Academy.

    Color: Pink
    Motto:
    “Make haste, slowly” better translated as “Proceed expeditiously, but prudently.”
    Family Crest: Crest with Stag

     

    House Dohan honors Edith Hall Dohan, Woodstock Academy Class of 1895. Mrs. Dohan was a leader in the field of archaeology. She went on to Bryn Mawr and was the first woman to receive a Ph.D. from that college. She had a professional reputation as an "explorer," as she conducted archeological excavations in Greece and Crete, an expert in Roman and Etruscan Art. Ms. Dohan was a Professor of Classical Archaeology and Greek at Mount Holyoke College for Women, a Curator of Classical Collections at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, author of books and articles, and editor of the Journal of American Archaeology. She had an international impact in her field and was a forerunner of the paths accessed by women in the 20th century. 

    Color: Green 
    Motto: “Ever to Excel” 
    Family Crest: Crest with archeological tools

     

    House Hyde honors Elizabeth Sanford “Betty” Hyde, the first woman in Academy history to hold the title of president of the Board of Trustees. Mrs. Hyde saw the potential for The Woodstock Academy to serve communities beyond Woodstock and Eastford. Thus, she led the charge in working with Connecticut legislators and Department of Education officials to ensure that The Academy would be eligible for state grants to expand its facilities. It is because of Mrs. Hyde’s foresight and diligence that students in the Quiet Corner, across the country, and around the world are able to enjoy The Academy’s expansive educational experience. 

    Color: Blue
    Motto: “Onward”
    Family Crest: Crest mechanisms of engineers

     

    McClellan House honors the McClellan brothers, John and James, who bore the Academy’s inception. Their father, Samuel McClellan, was a General in the Revolutionary War, and together, the three McClellan men helped gain support to establish The Woodstock Academy and to build the original Academy Building in 1801. In 1802, Samuel, John, and James all served as proprietors and trustees of The Woodstock Academy. Together as administrators, they sought to constantly better The Academy by securing brilliant educators and making improvements, like the bell atop the Academy Building. During the grand celebration of opening the Academy Building, John McClellan said the following, “the education of children and youth is one of the highest and most important duties… We wish to promote, as much as our means will afford, a useful education among the rising generation, and to bring all necessary education home to our doors. We are happy to meet and facilitate on another that our unanimity and exertions have produced so much, and that a school is now established.”  (Ammidown H. p525) The McClellan’s devotion to education and The Woodstock Academy is only strengthened by their family motto, “Think on!”

    Color: Rust orange
    Motto: “Think On”
    Family Crest: Crest with McClellan bell.

  • Recent House Updates